If skydiving is on your bucket list, get started by reading this one-on-one talk with skydiving safety and training advisor Brad Vancina.

I started with a tandem skydive. As soon as my feet touched the ground I knew I was going to be a skydiver. That summer, I got my USPA (United States Parachute Association) license. I spent two years at the DZ I started at then was hired for a weekend camera position at Skydive Chicago.

Skydiving is a very physical sport. I take care of myself and have always maintained a good level of fitness. I ride my mountain bike a lot; I run on my treadmill a couple of days a week, and try and eat right. The gear we wear is heavy–24 kilos—plus the weight of our tandem passengers. We also deal with the heat, so drinking heaps of water and core strength are key to longevity in our trade.

If you’re getting into skydiving, don’t take chances. We belong to an organization called the United States Parachute Association where I am a safety and training advisor. We work and operate under a certain perimeter of rules. If you follow the rules and take the time and money to get certified at a USPA DZ, you will be a good and safe skydiver. If you can’t do that, don’t skydive.

To date, I have made over 22,400 jumps. I must have had around 4,500 jumps when I got my Tandem rating. It took me over 17,000 jumps to get my AFFI (freefall instructor) rating.

My dad inspired me to skydive. He wasn’t a skydiver but his love for aviation and flying became my inspiration. I was the kid in the family that marched to my own drum. Flying is nice but skydiving is just next level.

My most memorable jumps was when I was teaching and jumping with my children, and doing tandem jumps with my mom and dad.

We are a family run and operated skydive center that is current in the industry. Our methods are world recognized and our equipment is the best that money can buy. Here, you are training and jumping with professional and USPA-rated tandem and AFF instructors. As far as I know, we are the only professional skydiving center in the Philippines.

We only use the best skydiving gear. All of our tandem equipment are Micro Sigma, made by UPT (USA). We use 330-square-feet Icarus Tandem Canopies from New Zealand, Performance Designs Reserves (USA) and Vigil and Cypress AAD’s (Automatic Activation Devices). If you can’t afford what’s safe and modern both for gear and training, then you should probably take up a different sport.

My wife, Louise (an Ilongga and a surgical ICU nurse from Chicago), and I were already operating our own skydive center south of Chicago when we came to the Philippines. We saw there was nothing of the sort here and started to do the research into how we could make it work. After an email to Capt. Alvin Boyd Loreno, a commercial pilot and flight instructor from Mactan, I found a guy that was interested and understood the need to follow rules if there was going to be professional skydiving in the Philippines.

We all took a chance together and formed Skydive Greater Cebu. Boyd knew the ins and outs of airspace rules here with CAAP and plays an important role in government relations and our aircraft maintenance and safety. We started in Bantayan Island, Cebu in 2013 and it continues to be our flagship operation. That’s where we get our biggest numbers as well as all our USPA AFF certifications and licensing.

Because of how hard it was to travel here in the Philippines, we realized it would be good to open a location South of Cebu. Siquijor was a perfect choice.

My wife and I always had our eye on Palawan but it wasn’t until this year that we decided to do a trial run. We have been open in xx, Palawan but we are shutting down and reopening in November. I feel it will be our best location in two years.

Any USPA Skydive Center that follows the course to a T and has highly experienced instructors is good if you want to learn skydiving. If their instructor has less than 1,000 jumps, he/she has no business teaching someone how to skydive.

Skydiving is a progressive sport. It’s best to go to a progressive DZ to get a license and make your tandem skydive. Make sure their training methods are current and the equipment they use are made within the past six years.

Pick a DZ with instructors that have time to jump with you. Some instructors like to rush to the next student because that’s how they make their money. Pre and post-jump briefings are very important, and you can’t do those while running to the next student.

Skydiving is a pretty competitive industry so the costs are pretty fixed. Most tandem jumps with video are around USD400. AFF levels are usually around USD200 – 250 per level. Once licensed most DZ’s offer slots to altitude for USD25 – 45. If you see a real cheap skydiving center, you should be very concerned and ask a lot of questions.

Being a scuba diver, my wife and family often find ourselves in Malapascua Island, diving with our good friends at DiveLink Cebu. I am excited to open our skydiving center in xx, Palawan in <target date> because the diving and surfing there is awesome and not as crowded.

There are many good restaurants in Bantayan Island, Cebu. You can’t go wrong with most of the sugba-sugba (grilled seafood) places and I can never give a good lechon station a pass. A trip to Cebu is never complete without a bowl of spicy ramen from Hamakaze.

I grew up in the farmlands of Illinois. My dad always supported my love for motocross bikes and BMX vert riding. As I grew up, I raced XC and downhill mountain bikes, all while twisting throttles on motocross bikes.

I still ride mountain bikes a couple of days a week. I found a great group of Filipinos here on Bantayan Island. We ride Enduro Motocross and trail rides from Bogo to Cebu. My greatest passion of all is surfing. It’s the only thing that still scares me.

I like beaches. Where the beach is doesn’t really matter as long as there are nice wave coming in. I’m not too good at just relaxing. One of the best times of my life were the years I spent living in Australia. It was the perfect mix of jumping all day and running to the beach with my board every afternoon.

We are quite happy here in the Philippines. There are a few things that drive me crazy with the way things get done, but for the most part you can’t beat the heart and warmth of the Filipino.ho is Brad Vancina?

Who is Brad Vancina?
Brad is the man behind the only USPA-affiliated skydiving centers in the Philippines: Skydive Greater, which now has two branches—it’s original location in Bantayan Island, Cebu; and Siquijor. Visit Skydivecebu.com