Our friends from Let’s Eat Pare tell us the all time fave sweets Filipinos love to serve in any given holiday.

Ube Halaya

Ube Halaya or purple yam to the rest of the world. It’s something the world just discovered yet we’ve been snacking on it for decades. Photo by Mon David Pakingan

The world is at least a century late on having discovered the wonderful flavor of the humble purple yam or ube. It’s sweet; has a bit of a gritty texture (in a good way); and goes well with virtually any dessert, especially with the next item on this list.

To enjoy this delicious treat, it’s best served on a plate drizzled with either condensed milk, coconut milk with a bit of sugar, or cheese.

Halo halo

The king of all Pinoy desserts, the halo-halo. By Jocas See

Widely considered the quintessential Filipino dessert because it has it all. It’s like the Japanese shaved ice dessert kakigori but with more to it than ice. You’ve got beans of nearly every size and shape, green and red gelatin (or really any color you want), strips of macapuno, jackfruit, or maybe some bananas. Some throw in corn kernels to the mix. Have it topped with some ube, a scoop of ice cream, and the next item on this list.

Leche Flan

A new twist to the leche flan: a LeCheesecake. It’s a (mini) cheesecake with leche flan on top. Photo by Niki Alfaro

A staple in every Filipino celebration that involves food, the leche flan looks like a simple custard but it’s more than that. It has that distinct combination of sweet and creamy, making it an ultra sinful, hard-to-resist dessert. Its many forms include the LeCheesecake from Nikita’s Pastries.

Buko Pandan

Two things combine in this ridiculously simple (yet delicious) dessert: glistening green pandan-flavored gelatin and the ever-refreshing and popular strips of coconut. Take these two and combine them with all-purpose cream and sweetened milk and you have yourself something that is a sure hit at any party table.

Tibok tibok

A dessert hailing from Philippine gastronomy capital, Pampanga in the North, that has graced many holiday buffet tables in Central Luzon and Metro Manila. The taste is akin to a spoonful of the widely-known maja blanca—soft, delicate, almost melt-in-your-mouth—but this one is a tad bit salty, thanks to the use of carabao’s milk.

Words by Andronico Del Rosario, with information from members of Let’s Eat Pare®