#WeShopAsOne: Filipino celebs who shop local

#WeShopAsOne: Filipino celebs who shop local

All the more we look up to these stars for their support of local makers, from bag crafters to fashion designers.

Homegrown designers having their creations shown abroad is nothing new; Filipinos are, after all, quite creative when it comes to design.

But what’s worth celebrating more is the growing patronage of our very own celebrities for local brands. The upside? Since these stars are most people’s fashion inspirations, then the geniuses in our fashion industry get the limelight they very well deserve. Here are a few of these local-loving personalities who we are giving our nods to.

Marian Rivera-Dantes (@marianrivera)

The Hispanic showbiz royalty that is Marian Rivera is known to rock local threads, specifically local weaves, which she pairs with classic pieces. A search for #kaTribuYan on Instagram yields local designers like Ivara Seron (@ivaraseron), Yong Davalos (@yong.studio), and Jor-El Espina (@jorel.espina).

Heart Evangelista (@iamhearte)

A person who’s no stranger to the world of fashion is Heart Evangelista. Yes, people know her for wearing some of the most popular fashion brands in the world, but she’s also known to #wearlocal (not an official hashtag, but we would like it to be) particularly by designers such as Bea Valdes (@beavaldesdesign) and Mark Bumgarner (@markbumgarner). Oh, and did we mention she’s the creative director of local fashion brand Kamiseta?

Maxine Medina (@maxine_medina)

A lady who’s no stranger to the catwalk (model, designer, former Bb. Pilipinas-Universe), Maxine Medina has been seen in clothes that one might recognize without being in the fashion industry. But did you know that one of her favorites as far as jewelry is (at least according to her IG) concerned are by local designer Marcy Lim‘s (@marcysjewelry)?

Cat Arambulo-Antonio (@catarambulo)

This lady went from being in PR and brand management to a beauty columnist, a brand ambassador, and an interior designer. She’s also one proud momma, but we’re here for her sense of fashion, especially in carrying local creations from the likes of Lally Dizon (@lallydizon_mnla) and her collaboration with up-and-coming Mindanaoan label KAAYO Modern Mindanao (@kaayo.ph).

Karen Davila (@iamkarendavila)

Anthony Ramirez (@anthonyramirezdesigner). Jewelmer (@jewelmer, top-of-the-line South Sea Pearls, in case you’re wondering). Mark Bumgarner. Filip+inna (@filipinna). This fashionable journalist has worn them either on air or in events she hosts/attends. She’s no stranger to the spotlight, what with hosting a show on ANC and all, so why not use it as a showcase for local designers?

Lyn Ching-Pascual (@lynching7)

Morning shows at GMA 7 were always pleasant, especially when this lady was on screen. The morning show host has been a part of Unang Hirit ever since it aired in December 1999, and she’s brighten up her fair share of mornings not only with her wit but also with her fashion sense, especially with her Katre (@katrehq) bags.

Any notable brands and celebs we missed? Hit us up in the comments section below!

Glamp in style at Nacpan Beach Glamping, El Nido

Glamp in style at Nacpan Beach Glamping, El Nido

Top tier camping facility Nacpan Beach Glamping opened its doors in one of El Nido’s quieter areas, Nacpan, about an hour’s ride from the main town—a thumbs up to those wanting to camp but with creature comforts at bay.

Isn’t it grand?

In a one-hectare land now sits nine luxe tents surrounded by palm trees and shrubbery, mere steps away from what The Telegraph has described as one of the “29 dreamiest beaches on Earth.” Nine more tents are set to open in October.

Here’s how it looks from the outside.

The tents made from canvas with heavy-duty cotton built to withstand the El Nido weather, come with a zipped mesh and PVC windows, and view of either the beach or the mountains. The interiors are set in earthen tones furnished with queen bed set on top of a native-style sisal rug, has thoughtful touches like a Japanese pendant light, and airconditioning, which you don’t really need if you’re breathing pristine sea breeze.

This is how it looks inside.

Food at Nacpan Beach Glamping is part of the stay you pay for and you get it from the Nacpan Sunmai Restaurant located right beside the campsite. It features an international menu with local favorites like sisig and grilled tanigue mixed with Japanese katsu, Italian pizza, and smoothie bowls. Other exciting stay inclusions guests get to experience are a one-hour sunset sail, and origami classes using coconut leaves.

Visit between December and May and you may get the chance to see turtle hatchlings being released.

The basics
Php7,500 per night for two; however, a tent can fit up to four
Nacpanbeachglamping.com
Tel: +63956 234 0162

Get there. SkyJet Airlines (skyjetairlines.com) has regular flights from San Vicente, Palawan where a van can take you to El Nido. Get off at Discover El Nido office on Amboy Street in El Nido town and hop on the Nacpan Shuttle Service.

Stars for Christmas: the Philippine parol

Stars for Christmas: the Philippine parol

Christmas maybe from the West, but the parol is truly Filipino.

The West may have developed the idea of Christmas, but the Filipinos have embraced it possibly more than the rest of the world. Case in point: the Philippines having the “longest Christmas” in the world, with decor and the holiday spirit kicking in as early as September.

A quintessential part and perhaps the most unique symbol of Christmas in the Philippines is the ever-present parol, a five-point-star-shaped lantern usually made of bamboo sticks and colored paper.

Taken from the Spanish word farol (meaning lantern or street light), its origins are said to date back to the early 1900s in Pampanga. First made by Francisco Estanislao, its base design, a five-point star pretty much stay unchanged since its inception.

Materials used vary from simple—bamboo sticks for the frame covered by papel de hapon or colored cellophane—to complex—steel, white or stained capiz shells, and a bunch of wires and circuitry. You can find at least one parol by the façade of Filipino home, or as part of the holiday decor beautifying streets of busier metropolises like Makati.

If you’re looking for the best designs, look no further than San Fernando City in the province of Pampanga. Lantern making in this city is an art and a livelihood, and is best embodied in the annual Giant Lantern Festival, held a couple of weeks before Christmas in December annually.

The basics
Get there. Take a Partas or a Victory Liner bus from these transport companies’ terminal in Cubao to get to San Fernando, Pampanga. Travel time is about one hour.

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